Posts Tagged With: Substitution Cipher

There’s a Little Real History in my Alternate History #6

The sailors have harvested as much wood as they can from the corpse of la Santa Maria, and building has begun. It’s an awkward-looking square taking shape on the beach, just above the high-water line. I’m trying to picture the men from three ships fitting into the bones of one, and I wonder. What’s the point of this, other than to mark Colón’s claim on this land, on this people?
~”So The Taino Call It”

Whaddaya know? Back in the fall of 2012, I ran a series of blog posts talking about the real history in my alternate history novella “So The Taino Call It.” Recently there’s been stuff in the news that calls for an update.

Continue reading

Categories: Books/Authors, History | Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Blog Birthday Winner!

It’s time to announce the winner of my Blog Birthday Giveaway!

subcipher ww-cover

Continue reading

Categories: Books/Authors, Holiday Posts | Tags: , , , ,

Happy Blog Birthday! Part 2!

My blog is two years old today! Happy Birthday to the blog!

Yojimbo pondering

Two years? Seriously?

Yes. Two years!

Isn't that wild?

Isn’t that wild?

Continue reading

Categories: Holiday Posts | Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Substitution Cipher Winner!

subcipher

Time to announce the winner of last week’s Indigenous Peoples Day Giveaway Contest! That winner is…

C. Schwab!

Check your inbox for a DRM-free digital copy of Substitution Cipher, C! And thanks to everyone for commenting.

 

Categories: Books/Authors | Tags: , ,

Indigenous People’s Day – Plus Free Books!

So, I’ve had a problem with the celebration of Columbus Day ever since grade school when I first figured out that Columbus never set foot anywhere in North America, let alone the part that became the U.S. My disdain for the holiday only grew when I learned that Leif Ericson was actually the first European to land on the continent. Why don’t we have a Leif Ericson Day instead, I wondered. (Actually, we sort of do–October 9. Did you know this? I didn’t until now.)

 

Statue of Leif Erickson which stands in Milwau...

Statue of Leif Ericson in Milwaukee, WI.  He doesn’t look as Vikingy here as he does in many other statues. Interesting. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Where was I? Oh yeah. Columbus Day. Like I said, it was the initial logicfail of the holiday that threw me off the bandwagon, but it was discovering more of what Columbus’s explorations began–colonization and genocide–that really got my goat. Like The Oatmeal asks in his latest cartoon, this guy’s worth celebrating?

 

My only problem with the cartoon is that, while I agree that Bartolomé de las Casas was the better man and deserves recognition for what he tried to accomplish once he repented of his earlier ways, by turning Columbus Day into Bartolomé Day, we’d still just be celebrating another dead white guy.

 

Bartolome de las casas

Bartolome de las casas–better than Columbus, but still… (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Another dead white guy who, I have to admit, I used as a source while writing my novella “So The Taino Call It.” De las Casas’ book A Short Destruction of the Indies provides a lot of information about what Columbus and the men who came after him did to the original residents they found on the islands they “discovered.” But it is those original residents I think we should really be remembering today. There’s already a name for that holiday: Indigenous People’s Day. What would their lives be like, if the Europeans had never shown up in the first place? Or showed up in peace and humility? We’ll never know, but it’s interesting to think about.

 

In honor of that holiday, how’d you like to win a digital copy (DRM-free) of the anthology Substitution Cipher, a Candlemark & Gleam book that contains several cool alternate history stories of espionage, one of which is my tale of what might have happened if Columbus’s first voyage didn’t go quite as planned? Substitution Cipher also includes G. Miki Hayden’s tale “In God We Trust,” which explores a different historic path the people of North America might have taken.  There are also tales of Berlin, Venice, World War II, and the Cold War. It’s a neat collection. Comment on this post here and I’ll pick a random winner by next Monday.

 

Happy Indigenous People’s Day!

Millie Ketcheschawno, filmmaker, organizer and activist for Native American rights; she was one of the founders of the first Indigenous People's Day (still an annual event) in the U.S. 1937-2000

Millie Ketcheschawno, filmmaker, organizer and activist for Native American rights; she was one of the founders of the first Indigenous People’s Day (still an annual event) in the U.S. 1937-2000

 

 

Categories: Books/Authors, Holiday Posts | Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Giveaway Results

We sometimes do things the old-fashioned way here at skinnier than it is wide. No randomizer programs, not even coin-flipping. For the Substitution Cipher giveaway, commenters’ names went into a 49ers baseball cap and R picked the winner.

And that winner is…

Jennifer Krouse

Check your email soon for your digital copy of Substitution Cipher and thanks for playing. Thanks to C. Schwab for commenting, too, and for everyone else for checking out my blog. My visitor count went way up this week. You guys should have commented, too. 🙂

Categories: Books/Authors | Tags: ,

Well, That Turned Out Well…

The Preditors & Editors Poll results came out today. A lot of Candlemark & Gleam folks did quite well, and I was tickled to see that Substitution Cipher came in at number 11 on the list of best anthologies. Just shy of the top ten, which is quite exciting for a newb such as myself. So, thanks to everyone who voted for it! I and all the other authors really appreciate it.

Did you vote in the P&E poll? What did you think of the results? What are some of your favorite books of 2012? Let me know in the comments, and you could be the lucky winner of an electronic copy of Substitution Cipher, just cuz. Well, this is my hundredth post on this blog. Why the hell not?

I’ll pick the winner on Sunday, January 13 January 20 (c’mon, M, learn how to read a calendar). And if you already own a copy? Thank you! Please spread the word.

Photograph of President Truman and others with...

Why, WordPress, why? Photograph of President Truman and others with their backs turned to the camera, looking out a window near the summit… – NARA – 199297 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Categories: Books/Authors, Polls, Writing | Tags: , , , ,

Weekly Linkroll

So, the last linkroll of 2012. Hard to believe it’s the end of the year already. Damned metabolism slowing me down and speeding up the rest of the world.

At least, that’s my theory.

“I don’t remember that…?”
One of several blog reviews (and the funniest) that allowed me to lose any feeling of obligation I might have had to see The Hobbit. Just not gonna. Yes, I’m one of those Tolkien fans. Thanks very much.

Joyous Christmahanukwanzeidstice to all, and to all a good night.
I’m a sucker for flow charts. What can I say?

Christmas on Mars
Diane Turnshek writes into the Whatever blog about her experience at the Mars Desert Research Station.  Very cool.

Christmas Pose-Off: Lights vs. Tights
Jim Hines and John Scalzi face off again in another pose for charity. Hines just knows how to do this.

Preditors and Editors Readers’ Poll
Critters / Critique.org is hosting their annual readers’ poll and Substitution Cipher has been nominated for best anthology! The website’s a challenge to navigate, but a lot of cool titles have been nominated in several categories. Check it out.

 

Categories: Weekly Linkroll | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Weekend Linkroll

Happy Holidays, everyone, whatever you celebrate this time of year! Belated Happy Hanukkah and Solstice! We finally have some snow here in Vermont, so it’s not looking so damned gloomy outside anymore. The brown ground and grey skies were starting to get to me.

So, links. Hope you enjoy.

Writer’s High
Empty Pen and endorphins. It’s an awesome feeling when you get that nagging scene right.

So You Want to Read PKD? Here’s Some Help.
SJ over at Snobbery has created an amazing flowchart to help you figure out which Philip K. Dick story you should read next. Personally, with Substitution Cipher just out, I’m hankering to reread The Man in the High Castle.

Day of Rest
Feeling frazzled? A Thousand Shades of Grey shares some thoughts (and great quotations) on the rightness of being yourself. “The message is sending me a universe.”

Possible habitable zone planet is a mere 12 light years away
Tau Ceti, eh? A lot of science fiction has happened there because it’s so close to us (relatively). Will there be spider people? Romulans? Barbarella? Time will tell.

Hasbro to unveil gender neutral Easy-Bake Oven
Thanks to McKenna Pope’s change.org petition for her little brother. It’s about time.

Michigan cousins go after crayfish, hook a mastodon
“The ‘coolest’ show-and-tell item anyone’s ever brought to the sixth grade.”

Categories: Weekly Linkroll | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Obligatory Photo of the Author Reading Her New Book

M. Fenn reading Substitution Cipher

Finished reading Substitution Cipher for the first time this afternoon. I’m pretty pleased. “So The Taino Call It” is in some very good company, and our editor Kaye Chazan did a wonderful job putting this collection together. Very neat to see the worlds that everyone has created. And reading my story in print, as opposed to in manuscript? An amazing feeling. Congrats to everyone involved! And thanks to everyone who helped me become a part of it. It didn’t take a village, but I didn’t do it by myself.

Categories: Books/Authors, Writing | Tags: , , , ,

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: